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Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

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Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:27 pm

Back2basics I trult appreciate all the wonderful info you've provided but I did want to condence it a bit so I placed all the info on famous pit dogs under this thread, please let me know if you would like the title of the thread to be something else as this is yours.
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:29 pm

Ferguson's Centipede

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:34 pm

It is perhaps impossible for modern dog people to realize the great reputation that Ferguson's Centipede enjoyed in the late 30s and early 40s. Perhaps it is sufficient to say that there was never any doubt that he was the best pit dog in the country at that time. Also, more than any other dog, he helped launch the popularity of the Old Family Red Nose strain, although he was more often referred to at the time as a "Lightner dog." At the beginning of his career, Centipede may not have been a unanimous choice for best dog in the country, as his ability was so great that it was not known if he was game. But his final match was against George Saddler's Black Boy, and it went two hours and twenty-two minutes without a turn by either dog, with Centipede finally prevailing.
It was the third contest which convinced everyone of what a great dog Centipede was. Saddler was known to scout his opponent in a big money match like the one with Centipede, and he brought a dog that he thought could beat him. The fact was that both dogs had a reputation as bone-crushing pit warriors. I have an original flyer that advertised the fight, much as a modern prize fight, with Centipede being touted as the "Cream of Oklahoma" and Black Boy as the "Pride of the Delta."
Centipede was whelped about 1933 in the kennels of L. C. Owens in Texas. He was the result of Dan McCoy's having discovered that there was still some of the old Lightner blood down in Louisiana. McCoy and Bob Hemphill made the journey down to that part of the country and bought several dogs. Hemphill kept his close to the vest, but Dan McCoy was always on the move and couldn't keep dogs, so he left his with trusted friends, including Arthur Harvey and L. C. Owens in Amarillo, Texas. Owen's Mickey was bred to the renowned Harvey's Red Devil to produce the litter which contained Centipede.
When I met Bill Lightner in Colorado Springs, he and his wife were in their eighties, and they kept a kennel of basically small dogs of various coloration. Lightner and his wife were uncanny in their ability to select good brood stock. They had left the red, red-nosed dogs down in Louisiana because Lightner didn't like the looks of those dogs, and he felt they were coming out too big. Centipede would be an example of that, as his pit weight was 54 pounds. To listen to many modern dog men, the old time pit dogs were never that big, but not only were there these two great dogs at that size, but they each had been matched twice before they were matched into each other. Be aware that pit weight in those days was lighter than today, so the dogs were easily sixty-five pounds on the chain.
Other than size, the only fault with Centipede was that he was a laid back dog and nearly impossible to work. Frustrated, Owens sold him to Earl Tudor. Although something of a genius in working dogs, even Tudor had a problem with Centipede. When he walked the dog, he stayed back at the end of the leash. Puzzled, Tudor stopped and looked at the dog, and the dog lay down! As patient as he was with the dogs, he wasn't sure that he could ever get Centipede in shape. He decided to rely upon natural ability and endurance for his first contest, which Centipede won handily in less than thirty-five minutes.
The next opponent had a bit of a reputation, so Tudor enlisted his friend Red Howell to work the dog. Now Red was a real genius with dogs, a harbinger to the coming of Ham Morris just a few years later, another gem at training animals. Red never used force in training his dogs, but he understood their psychology. He discovered that Centipede was a natural house dog, and he would do anything for attention. Red's girls would dress Centipede up in dresses and put lip stick on him, and the dog thrived on it.
Red and Centipede worked out a deal. If Centipede would run the turn table mill for a specified time, he could go in the house after his rub down. Nothing else would work. Centipede was unexcited by cats, and if Red placed a dog in Centipede's view, his eyes showed fire, but the dog was too smart to not know that the harness was keeping him from getting to the dog, so he didn't run the mill. Somehow Red was able to convey to the dog that he would get a reward for running the mill. The first time he took a few steps on the mill, Red brought him in the house. Very quickly, the dog got the idea. So Centipede spent a good part of his keep in Red's house with his young daughters. Howell told Bob Wallace that Centipede was absolutely the smartest dog he ever saw of any breed. He would bring Red a bottle of beer, opening up the ice box to get it. Red swore that he could have taught him to open those bottles too.
The match between Centipede and Black Boy would qualify as a classic contest. The dogs met in the center like a couple of freight trains, and first Black Boy had the upper hand. In fact, the lead changed a couple of times, with its being anyone's match up until the two-hour mark. At that point, Centipede finally took command for good. Saddler gave it up in 22 more minutes in a desperate attempt to save his dog.
After Centipede beat Black Boy, Tudor couldn't get him matched, as everyone conceded that he was the best. Nothing his weight, or any weight, could beat him. That was the common opinion among dog men. This was evidenced by the fact that Tudor opened him up at catchweight with no takers. Frustrated, Tudor sold the dog to Dave Ferguson.
Now Dave Ferguson was well known and liked as a pit dog aficionado, but he couldn't keep dogs, as he played trumpet in a big name band. He toured the country, and he spent a lot of time in New York and in San Francisco. For that reason, he left the dog with various trusted friends in the dog game. Dave was a good hearted guy, and he always allowed that whoever was keeping the dog could not only breed to him, but stud him out as well. Because of this situation and the dog's great reputation, the dog was bred a lot, and if we trace back our pedigrees far enough, we will find Centipede there some place. We could do a lot worse!
Dave Ferguson was drafted into the army during the second World War, and he received decorations for heroism. None of the dog men were surprised about this, as they had always referred to him as "the little man with the big heart." Unfortunately, Ferguson was shot and killed by a sniper in the last days of the war. There were lots of losses during that war, but that one particularly threw a pall over the pit dog fraternity.
Centipede died in the yard of D. A. McClintock, another genius with animals and a great lover of the Old Family Red Nose strain. By the time McClintock received the dog, he wasn't producing any more, but he took care of him and even gave him time in the house. Like Red Dunham before him, McClintock considered Centipede the smartest dog he had ever seen.
Beyond being smart, Centipede was considered a great dog, the greatest pit dog of his time. When someone of those days referred to "the great one," they didn't have to mention the name. Everyone knew that it was Centipede.
Copyright 2001, The Pit Bull Reporter
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:30 pm

Indian Bolio ROM

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Bolio was bred by Maurice Carver and Eddie Klaus in 1969. His sire was the famous pit ace Klaus' Zeke and his dam was Klaus' Goldie. Bolio's pedigree is very heavy in the blood of a bitch named Carver's Judy and her sister thegreat Carver's Black Widow. In fact he carried fifty percent of this blood in his breeding. Bennett Clayton of Texas bought Bolio from Carver and sent him to Floyd Boudreaux to be matched, he was hooked into a dog that had killed both of his previous opponents. This dog's name was Rowdy. Bolio was contracted into Rowdy twice. The first time Floyd was not content with Bolio's conditioning for the fight, he knew that Bolio must be perfect to fight a dog of this caliber. After Floyd paid the forfeit he set up a new match with Rowdy for the big night of a southern convention. This time Bolio was in great shape and when they hit, it was a real war. Bolio killed Rowdy in about two hours and was voted best in show! At this same convention, there were many champions being shown and among them was Davis' Grand Champion Boomerang. I was not at this fight and I got my information from other dog men and the sporting dog magazines. Sometime after the fight Bolio was sold to a fancier in southern California.

The new owner of Bolio was not interested in matching him again, even though I felt he was the best 43 lb. dog alive at the time. He decided to use him as a stud dog and that was the best use for him. Bolio was so talented he never got hurt in rolls. I was lucky enough to see him roll many times against all kinds of dogs including dogs that were up to 15 pounds larger than he. He handled ALL his opponents with ease. I have not seen a large number of the famous foundation dogs fight and maybe some of them were better dogs than Bolio. I have seen many fast lane dogs in action since these foundation dogs faded into the past and I can say that Bolio is the best dog I have ever seen pound for pound. He was not an extremely hard biter, but he could shut his mouth. He was very skilled at keeping his holds and sometimes it would appear that he was glued to his rivals head, he liked to fight the head. He was very strong and fast wrestler and would quickly get his hold and then use his body weight and muscle power to wear the opponent down while punishing him the whole time. He would move in such a way that the other dog would be carrying most of Bolio' weight with him. When the other dog would slow down from the head holds, Bolio would go into the throat. If a dog did happen to get Bolio off his head, Bolio would go toe to toe with him, but not for long. Bolio would work his way back to the head and again be in total control. He was the fastest, smartest, and most effective head dog that I have ever seen. He had natural air and I never saw him slow down. He was a very intense dog and he loved to fight. When in the corner he would scream with rage until he was released into the other dog. Occasionally, he would bite you if not released quick enough.

Bolio as a producer was the best stud dog that I know of that ever lived. He was bred to some poor cur bitches and produced excellent pit dogs from them. When he was bred to good bitches, those results were amazing. Some friends of mine had a dispute with Bolio's owner and ended up taking the dog while he was at church. I had no part in the taking of Bolio from his owner's yard and do not know the details of the dispute between him and my friends. I don't use his name because the purpose of this article is to praise Bolio, not to put down his former owner. Bolio's former owner had stolen dogs from me and so I feel that I owed him nothing. When the people who took Bolio offered me breeding rights to the dog, I accepted immediately. Bolio remained on my yard until he died at the age of thirteen. He would sire litter after litter of good dogs and I would rate him as a better stud dog that my Tombstone dog, who was also a great stud in his own right. Bolio produced fine dogs from all his breedings, no matter what the bloodline was. His pups carried the same traits that made him such a great dog. When I bred a daughter of Bolio's, Red Baby, to Tombstone, the result was thirteen very good dogs. Eight of these dogs won 20 matches. the other five five was used as brood bitches. Champion Tonka, Champion Snubby, Champion Crash, and Creamator were some of the better known dogs I sold from this breeding.

One of the first bitches I bred to Bolio was Faith, a Clouse bitch. This breeding produced eight game and talented dogs, including Chen Leng and Champion Princess. Red Baby's mother was a sister to Offer's Crazy Babe, a pure Clouse bitch. Red Baby's litter was a bunch of great dogs.

I had a bitch named Tuffy that was heavy in Clouse blood. She was by Tater and Faith, and when I bred her to Bolio, I got some very good dogs including Bull Boy Bob ROM and Champion Dugan. Bolio worked well with good Tombstone and Clouse bitches. He also sired good ones to great dogs out of bitches from the bloodlines of Eli Jr. and Ironhead. This reminds me of a statement made by Ricky Jones. He said, "My favorite bloodlines are the Eli/Ironhead cross dogs that came from Maurice during the early and mid seventies. Percentage wise these dogs will get you to the pit more times than any other bloodline out there. There are a lot of good dogs from other bloodlines, but over all you will get more dog for your money and time from the Eli/Ironhead line." Ricky Jones can run any bloodline he wants and he has a right to his own opinion. I don't think any bloodline is so superior to the other top bloodlines that it wins every time. However, Ricky stated very clearly that his dogs will win more that any other, now how in the hell would he know this to be a fact, he never used anything except the Eli blood and did 99.9% of his winning in his own back yard! I say his opinion is weak and wrong! I owned and saw dogs of Bullyson, Eli Jr., and Ironhead when Ricky still had his hound dogs. I say the Bolio blood is superior and I sold my Bullyson-Eli Jr dogs to make room for the Bolio blood that I breed. I talked with Carver on many occasions and he told me more than twice that the Bolio dogs are his best without a doubt. In the whole article he never spoke about two of the best dogs he owned, Chome and Chocolate Soldier. These two dogs won 4 matches for him and they were bred by Diamond Jim out of a Bolio bitch bred to the great Luther dog. The mother of Chome and Soldier was Patrick's Rose. I understand that Jones had a lot of wins to his credit, but the fat is that a puppy I sold as a pet beat Grand Champion Sandman even though Sandman outweighed him by 3 lbs. I am talking about Grand Champion Buck, a Bolio dog. If Ricky can make a statement that his dogs are the best, I can tell you that the people with Bolio dogs aren't losing any sleep over his "Honest Dogs." I would not trade one good Bolio dog for any of his dogs. I quess most serious dog men run the line of dogs they like the best. Bolio's blood is by far the biggest part of my yard. Almost all my dogs have some Bolio blood in them and many are 60-70% Bolio blood. I don't think you get the best results by just inbreeding on one good dog. You need other good bloodlines to cross them with and to keep them strong. I am without a doubt the biggest Bolio fan in the world and i have been bragging about him for twenty years. Maurice Carver told me that "all the Bolio dogs will do for you is win. Lots of people don't like them after they win, but they get the job done!" Eddie Klaus and Maurice Carver deserve the credit for breeding Bolio and his great litter mates Mendicino, Andy Capp, Daisy, and Leggs Diamond. All I did was realize his potential as a stud dog. I am sure I would still have bulldogs if I had never heard of Bolio, but I know my yard is a better yard because of him. If I could have any dog that lived in the past, today, as a two year old dog, I would take Bolio!

-Pat Patrick
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:31 pm

Boudreaux Eli

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:39 pm

BOUDREAUX' ELI Vintage Match Report

MARCH THRU MAY 1968
Sixth Match:
JACK SMITH VS. FLOYD BOUDREAUX
Males at 38 pounds.
Cajun Rules, Howard Tee, Referee
Pete Sparks, Timekeeper

Jack is using a red dog called Bozo said to have been bought by Sonny Sykes from Jerome Hernandez. Floyd is using a black which he calls Eli. The black gets the first hold as Bozo gets skin hold in throat. Black is getting into the throat of Bozo as Bozo works the ear trying for a shoulder. 50 to 25 bets being made. Bozo the favorite. Black is showing good and working for Bozo's throat. All the dog fighting in the previous match is being wrapped up in a ten-minute space of time in this fight. Black gets in Bozo's throat at 14, then Bozo throws one leg over the black's shoulder, gets an ear and throws the black dog. Bozo gets a shoulder and shakes and the black dog gets a mouth hold and gets him off. Black up at 15 and into the throat. The black comes up and the bets shift to even money as both dogs are working the shoulders and front legs. Bozo gets the nose and shakes at 21. Changes to a hind leg, gets stifle and shakes. Bozo is working front leg. Back to mouth fighting at 25-minute mark. Bets getting hard to get at even money as first one then the other gets on top and gets nose and mouth. The black acts as though he has shot his wad. Bozo has opened up the black's front leg and the black is weakening. Story is that the black has heartworms. 38 and a pick up, Bozo to scratch. Made determined scratch, gets a front leg and the black goes into Bozo's neck. 40 a pick up, black scratches hard. Bozo gets nape of neck and the black goes down. 54 a pick up, Bozo to scratch. Made determined scratch. 57 pick up with black to scratch. Trotted over and took hold, gets an ear and Bozo goes down. Bozo makes a good scratch at the one-hour mark. One minute later the black makes a good scratch and Smith gives up the fight. Black makes a good courtesy scratch. Eli is the winner in one hour and one minute.

Boudreaux' Eli is without question one of the most famous of modern dogs from the 60's era. He and his sons Eli Jr. (sire of Gr. Ch. Art.-grandsire of Chinaman, Stompanato, Crenshaw's Ch. Rascal etc.) and Bullyson (sire of Ch. Honeybunch, Midnight Cowboy and Chivo, Loposay's Buster etc.) were used to create lines of their own and those in turn have spawned even more good lines of bulldogs. There is hardly a line of good dogs today that cannot trace its lineage back to the Eli dog. He was a product of inbreeding on Boudreaux' old Blind Billy dog (Dibo X Minnie) with some Trahan's Rascal (Dibo's half brother) blood thrown in, both good Tudor/Corvino bred dogs. I believe Mr. Boudreaux is still producing some fine dogs and I have talked to dog men who wouldn't have one from anyone else. Mr. Boudreaux has been breeding these dogs for over 35 years and has produced some of the best ever to look through a collar. The perfect southern gentleman and devoted family man, he is a real credit to the dog game and an excellent role model for the aspiring young dog man .
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:31 pm

Crenshaw's CH. Jeep

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:42 pm

Throughout the history of the sporting American Pit Bull Terriers, no single dog has made quite the impact as Garrett's CH. Jeep, and that being the combination of not only his worthiness as a supreme pit dog, but the ultimate supremacy of his reproduction. Jeep was bred by James Crenshaw and sold to James Garrett as a young dog and was campaigned and brought to notoriety by James Garrett asssisted by James Crenshas. Jeep achieved his fourth win over Ozzie Stevens' Ch. Homer. This fight making history, for the caliber of these two dogs meeting in the pit is unusual in itself. Although, Jeep the victor, Homer, in his own rights, had proved to be just as good a combat dog and both dogs were truly entitiled to the legacy that they have earned through this match.
Now that the formidable worth of Jeep has been established, we will go on to the greatest asset this dog ever possessed and that was his ability to reproduce a staggering figure of Champions, one Grand Champion and numerous one and two time winners. The conversation at many conventions always leads to great dogs and a dispute of which bloodlines are the best to utilize to get the highest percentage of game and winning dogs. I have often heard this one statement being passed when Jeep's name is brought up as to his high figure on the R.O.M. (Register Of Merit) list and that is, well look how many bitches JEEP was bred to to create the amount of Champions he has sired. My answer to those dogmen is this. Take three major pit dogs that are from outstanding bloodlines such as STP's Grand Champion Buck, six time winner, STP's Champion Toro and Burton's Grand Champion Hank, as these three were considered exceptional pit dogs and many utilized these three different bloods for the sole purpose of producing or establishing new lines from them. All three lived approximately to the same age which was ten years. Two were campained approximately the same time and died not to far apart, that being, Ch. Toro and Gr. Ch. Hank. Hank made his pit history prior to theirs, but was bred as many times as Jeep, if not more. Gr. Ch. Buck, probably second to Hank in the amount of his breedings and Toro, who was bred to 23 different bitches during this period. The fact is all three of these great dogs combined together, produced about half the number of Champions as Jeep has. So common, sense will tell you how many champions doesn't hold water. In retrospect, dogs like Ch. Homer, Gr. Ch. Art, and Tombstone who was bred limited amounts of times and was still able to produce high quality dogs should also be considered. Certain dogs should be on the ROM list considering the number of times they have been bred, like: Jeep, Buck, Yellow, Frisco and Mayday to name a few.
Some of the crosses which are well known where Jeep created some great dogs and the blood seems to click the best with are Jeep / Red Boy and Jeep / Rascal.
Ch. Jeep was born in August 1976 on the yard of James Crenshaw, in the famous litter of Finley's Ch. Bo ROM to Crenshaw's Ch. Honeybunch ROM. That produced four champions. The most famous of the four was Ch. Jeep ROM. But there was also Crenshaw's (Super Gnat's) Ch. Charlie, who has been said to have been a better pit dog than Jeep. Ch. Missy who is seen in alot of pedigrees today, and Swetman's Ch. Holly, who was said to be a terrible biter with lots of ability. This was a great litter that was made once, for reasons that I don't know.
CH. Jeep is believed by many to be one of the best match dogs of his time.
Defeated Pylant's Ch. Kato at 43 pounds in :28 minutes. Cooper's Weenie also at 43 pounds in :58 minutes. Stinson & Stepp's Black Dog, who was said to be a three time winner at 42 pounds in two hours and five minutes. And, for his fourth and final match we went into Ozzie Stevens' Ch. Homer, at 43 pounds and won in 3:45. This was one of those classic matches, that history is made from. Two great game dogs met, and only one could win. One created a legacy and the other a dynasty.
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:32 pm

Howard Heinzl Article

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:46 pm

How It Looks To Me
BY REVEREND HOWARD HEINZL


Many dog men you meet start by telling you how many years they have had Bull Terriers. I got my first one when I was 9 years old, and all of 31 years ago. All this proves to my way of thinking is that I like dogs, and mostly that I'm getting older. The hottest dog man around Arizona now is Charlie Spencer, who started about 4 years ago. He's won 3 or 4 good ones with his 48 pound Toby dog, and the one man to beat him so far was Ken Barney, at 36 pounds. Ken has had Pit Bulls about 2 1/2 years now, and will match one at the drop of a hat. Both Spencer's Toby and Kenny's 36 pound dog were bred by Ed Ritcheson, Ed lost three in a row trying to beat dogs of his own breeding with dogs he would buy around the country. From here on
Ed tells me he's using his own.

Another dog man bound to be heard from is Clarence Hager, his wife is as much of a fan as he is. He had two dogs stopped in rolls here lately, and he will shake hands with you afterward, and thank you for helping cull his kennel and cut his feed bill, as he put it. We've all seen old timers at the game who would pout and make excuses when one quit. The old timers who did anything don't have to tell you how many years
they have had Bull Terriers, you read about them in the records.

I think John P. Colby tops as a breeder. The rolls I saw when I was up at Colby's in 1935 or 1936 were better than half the matches I have ever seen in my life. John P. called them turn ups. It was hot around Boston so any local action was kept quiet. A lot of people who didn't know any better said J.P. never set one down. Three dead game Colby dogs I have had were Sport, Buddy, and Hobo. I think I have some good ones now but, to say a dog that is still living is dead game, is wishful thinking. None of these three dogs ever made a turn in there life or before they left it. I have over a dozen old Colby pedigrees around the house, and I can't find one of the dogs in them Mr. Pete Sparks mentioned in a recent copy of Bloodlines, I'm sure he was mistaken.

Back in about 1933 in Chicago, Bruce Johnson introduced me to Chuck Doyle, at the time he had a brindle bitch with a bad hind leg that was about to whelp. About a year and a half later we matched a 38 pound dog we bought from Jim Corrington, against one of these pups. We had Old Sandy in about fair chain shape, after all this rookie Doyle couldn't beat us wise old heads, he didn't miss it though. I think it lasted about 20 minutes, Doyles dog just waved Sandy around like a flag, and he started looking over his shoulder for help, so Bruce threw in the sponge. Doyle's dog wasn't even warmed up yet. I believe Tudor is in a class by himself, as a dog fighter I've read about different men being called tops in the business but, if they come close to Tudor's record
they must have been matching dogs on another planet.

When Tudor and Art Nemecheck ran a pit they won 23 UKC fights in one month, that's more than myself and a lot of other guys had in a lifetime, win or lose. It wasn't to long back that Tudor had a challenge in Bloodlines to match three dogs for $1,000 with him losing the grand if he didn't win all three go's. He made the first UKC Champion and John P. Colby bred him. Tudor's wife Flo is just as good a judge of pit dogs as he is and probably the worlds best cook. A fan out here told me that J.P. or his boy's never ever saw a convention, I don't know what that proves, neither did the Farmer Brothers
of Chicago, Rip Ryan, George Armitage or Red Considine
and they were all pretty fair dog men.

Armitage taught us all a little about making it out here. He said a match well made was half won. Just before Armitage arrived out here Wiz Hubbard matched Hube Yates, it was a bitch fight, (Lady vs Trilby) and spotted him 9 pounds. Wiz lost about $500 but picked his bitch up to save her. Armitage never fought many dogs in his life, but he sure matched them carefully. He thought Clark's Tramp was the best dog that ever lived. Tramp was pure Colby. We have a bunch of dogs out here now, the oldest of them are about 5 years old, some have fought at the convention, two in old Mexico and so far they are outstanding. This Spencer's Toby is one and Ritcheson's Lark,
Peggy, Monkey, Jeep, Pete, and Shiner are a few more of them,
that stood the test and are stand out pit dogs.

Five years ago I figured they would fall apart, as did a lot of other people, some of course quit like any line will, but for a new cross Ed breeds them back in and sure gets some outstanding pit dogs. He got his first ace Jeep by breeding his Jack Meeks Mouse to Hubbards Gimp. He then bred Jeep to Hubbards Sissy and raised his best bitch Spotty, who is the dam or grand dam of all aforementioned dogs. Their sire was Spike, a dog Ed bought from Al Brown, so this old rugged cross is part Meeks breeding part Feeley and half Al Brown's Spike. Spike also had some Feeley blood in his background.

One of the best dogs I ever saw was a red nosed dog from Chas Conklin in Lenox South Dakota. I don't think his red nose had anything to do with the size of his heart. Though I've seen and had red nosed dogs that would quit like a turkey, when I start breeding for color I'll sure call them Staffordshires because that's all they will be in a couple of generations. In reading through several back Bloodlines there are lots of pictures of good looking dogs at stud with captions telling how they can fight. I've yet to see an ad with what is a lot more important a record of how some of his sons and daughters have fought and maybe a copy of his breeding. Leading horse magazines always list the achievements of the stallions as not all good performers are good sires. Braddock and Billy Sunday were two great dogs in the pit
but never sired any outstanding pups.

I have an eight year old 40 pound Colby dog Kayo farmed out with some friends. He is the sire of Adams' Botcher who won in 1 hour and 40 minutes in Mexico. I wasn't down there at the time but have a film of the fight. Botcher went uphill 4 pounds and beat a good dog holding one nose hold 30 minutes which is longer than a lot of dogs will fight. They were both dead game dogs and proved it. Botchers dam was a little cross bred bitch that quit in about 10 minutes. I tried to talk Adams out of breeding her to Kayo but, he did and raised some good ones. Old Kayo is by Colby's Tinker out of Colby's Scarlett. He lost his teeth early but, stopped two bigger dogs Phil Faulkner shipped in from California in 30 minutes each. They were Tar Baby and Timmy. He also stopped a dog Black and Bill Anderson had called the Chicago dog in a little over 32 minutes and with no teeth he went 20 minutes with Lark. The best 50 pound dog we ever had out here, no one else cared to roll anything with Lark. And Leo White came out and wanted to see him go, now the only black mark on Kayo's record
should be on mine.

Before Ed Ritcheson and I were partners I matched Kayo into a black dog that Ed had that I didn't think was much. Kayo had poor wind and I thought some Knox gelatin before the fight would give him an added push, he wouldn't drink the beef broth I put in it so I mixed another packet of gelatin in about half a pint of goats milk and it sure choked the old boy down. He gagged and slobbered after the first five minutes he kept coughing up big strings of flem. Ed's dog wasn't hurting him so I let it go. After 56 or 58 minutes it was Kayo's turn to scratch and he waddled toward a couple steps gapping like a fish and was counted out. He didn't lay down, sit down or tuck his head in the corner, like a cur usually does. I picked him up and set him outside the pit. He was really wobbly and the whites of his eyes were solid red but he didn't flop down and rest. When Ed carried his black dog past to his car old Kayo staggered after him. I sure wasn't very proud of my conditioning but I made it up to the old boy, he's got a real good home up in the mountains with some swell people and has the run of there house and yard. I wont say any living dog is dead game but, I think a lesser dog than Kayo would have curled up and died after the going over Lark gave him.

A few of his better offspring are: Ken Barney's Sadie, Stewart Adams' Honest John, General, Botcher and I have a 46 pound son of his that will do, his name is Colonel. I have a pure Lightner stud dog Lightner's Tony, I'm sure Bill Lightner didn't keep him around just for a pet, but I will wait about 6 more months to brag about Tony as the dozen or so pups Ed and I have by him are a little young yet to set down hard but, they all act extra good and are hot to go. It's hard to get two or more people to agree on anything, I imagine that would apply even if they raised sheep. Well, Bull Dog people are no exception unless that we are harder headed than most groups. I think it would be interesting if a lot of fanciers would write in with there opinion of the best dog, best conditioner, best handler etc., etc.. I'm sure it would create quite a bit of interest.

When Art Shinler from Detroit conditioned the Smith Brothers dog against Bruce Johnson and myself he did a top job. Red Considine had Lena in as good a shape as a dog can get in Chicago, when she beat Bernero's Jackie in about 1932. Jim Curry had his Midas dog about right as they get for that Spider dog some Texas boys brought to Lexington in 1936. But, I still have to pick Earl Tudor when he is really cracking as boss of em' all. If you match him at a given weight you can't have a dog that is just a little better and win. The best dog I ever owned was Colby's Buddy. The roughest dog was Ed Ritcheson's Lark. The one I'd hate most to go up against and try to beat would be Tudor's Demon about 10 years ago. I haven't the paper or time to tell you about all the curs I've had but, I'm sure we all get them, and it makes those scarce game ones worth all the more. I've got dogs tied to dogs at my place. Any over a year old have been out at least 30 minutes (off the chain). I call them half honest and think in shape they will
be worth a bet, with all the other dogs of all ages and the care involved the job gets
a little old after 30 years but, I guess I'll have them 30 more if I live that long.

by,
Howard Heinzl 1955
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:33 pm

Plumbers CH Alligator

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 5:57 pm

I am constantly being asked questions about the Alligator dog and the family of dogs that has come about from this great old warrior.

It seems the more that’s said the more is left unsaid or at least overlooked and not purposely so.

Alligator came about as almost an after thought. Mr. Williams of Ft. Worth had obtained the Satin Lady bitch from Maurice Carver. She was a big, black pretty bitch that I never cared much about as an individual. She was one of these scatter-bred dogs Maurice was famous for. Unlike most of the Carver dogs she was cold. When it came time to breed her Mr. Williams went to Wichita Falls, Texas and bred her to Tudor’s old Nigger dog, which was owned at that time by J.E. King. Nigger was some of the last of the old Tudor stuff and had been on several yards before King got him.

The breeding was made, and as they grew into adulthood I was able to see and handle all three of these dogs. Alligator, as great as he was, had two littermates that in my opinion were at least as good if not better than him. There were Soko and Susan Renee’, both real bulldogs in every way.

Mr. Williams kept Alligator until he was just over a year old, so he could breed him back to his dam, which he did. Soko had shown so good at a young age for the little Plumber that the Plumbers went in together to buy Alligator.

When they bought him, I was certain they had an albatross, because he was so big. I figured they would never be able to get him hooked up. I also figured his chances of being as good as Soko were little to none at all. You have got to figure this was during an era of really great dogs, and who would ever expect this big, ugly dog to be anything special.

The Plumber’s started out with such a good bunch of dogs that they expected everything to be really fast lane. They had roll dogs better than most people’s match dogs, and were always looking for action and better dogs.

They felt they never had the luxury of a methodical schooling process. They were great dog men, but were hard on the dogs. They felt their dogs were either ace or near ace, or they were out of here with little regard for mediocrity.

Gator was started out on good dogs that were smaller than he was and most were just dominated by this optical illusion.

There were also several Brush Matches where Alligator would just run over the competition. The Plumbers were concerned because they had never seen him get his oil checked, even though he had been double dogged on several occasions.

They had got a Tudor dog from me named Zeke that was a plug, but very game. A fellow showed up on that place, and in the course of conversation said the old black dog did not impress him that much and he would bet ole Zeke could whip him. The Plumbers, being ever ready to show what sports they were, agreed on the bet and down they went. The fellow who underestimated Alligator was soon separated from his money when he told them to pick up Zeke, who was no match for the Alligator dog. As the stranger left, he made a statement that always holds true in the Bulldog world. "You sure can’t tell one by how they look".

In their quest for perfection, they made a request to use Trussell’s Dum Dum dog to see if Alligator was truly game. Dummy you see was a game dog that was even bigger than Alligator. It seems that in that day and time any dog from a cross, scatter bred or real rough were suspect of being a cur, so they did everything they could to stop Alligator. When they got to Trussell’s they ran Alligator on the tread mill for one half hour then fifteen minutes road work to cool him down, then to the roll pit, where he went over half an hour with the larger Dum Dum dog. It was nip and tuck and Alligator went across when he shouldn’t have on wobbly legs. This roll turned out to be a pretty good game test for Dum Dum too. When asked how it turned out, Trussell said, "The black dog gave Dummy everything he wanted."

The next match for "Alligator" was in the Big League at one of Maurice’s big ten match shows. He went in as a definite underdog, going into Bryant, males fifty eight pounds. Both dogs appeared to be in excellent shape and came to fight with a fast hard pace set for big dogs. Alligator goes to the legs with Bryant’s dog Satin swapping it out and going from legs to nose, and then getting into Gator’s stifle, where they swap it out. A turn is called on Satin at twenty-six minutes. A handle made at thirty minutes and Satin makes a good scratch. A handle is made and Alligator makes the scratch at forty minutes, taking Satin down to work the front legs. Satin takes the count at forty-five, making Gator the winner. There was much speculation among the huge crowd present if any one had a big one for this hound dog looking goof.

His next match was into a dog called Jack at catch weight. Alligator came in sixty pounds heavier. These heavy weights hit and the fight was on. Jack, a big staff looking dog takes Gator down and works him over for twenty minutes with Gator being content to take the bottom where he is always in hold. Gator is coming to the top and by thirty minutes it’s an even fight. Jack was a seasoned dog who had never met his equal and you can see Alligator has begun to come to the top as Jack begins to fatigue and get that far away look in his eyes. During the earlier part of the match, Bobby Ackel had commented on Gator may have met his match and Jimmy Jobe turned and said to me, as Gator was being trashed like a stepchild, "that if Jack was game and keeps this up, ole Gator could be in trouble". As the match was winding down Bobby Ackel said, "Ole Jack looks like he has bout had it", and sure enough in just the hour mark he takes the count. I went over to check on the Jack dog and offer any assistance I could and I noticed his stomach and chest. I could see what had made the difference in this match and it was the punishment Gator had dished out from the bottom and it was unbelievable. I heard later that Jack lived out his life in luxury after Gator ended his ring career.

There was some time after this match, as no one wanted any of the Gator Dog, so during a roll session at the Plumbers’ place; the Caddell’s showed up with several to school. These boys had some old time stuff the old man had been breeding for years and some were sure solid, from the Lightner-Colby stuff. They had a male named Jeff that was a big spotted dog, too big for everything on the place except Alligator. So he was taken off the chain to oblige the Jeff dog. This dog was the closest thing to Gator’s equal that I saw during his career. The roll ended early due to a bleeder being hit on Gator. Jeff went to the Midwest where he did very well and where I heard he made Champion.

When the Plumbers had about given up on another official match, word came from Oklahoma that a man named Brown had one he would run at the Alligator dog. Up to then, several had fallen through, but this one came off and as they say in the dogs these boys "brought a paddle for the Plumber’s ass." They had done their homework and rather than a punisher, they brought one that not only could punish but was versatile and smart. This dog could have whipped Gator and on another day might have. The dogs were conditioned by two of the best conditioners of the day. Gator conditioned by Burton and Joker conditioned by Fox. The match was males at fifty-seven pounds and Oklahoma Shorty was the referee. The dogs hit and Gator takes the bottom but is coming up from time to time and being frustrated by Joker’s style, that had never been too effective on him with the defensive dogs he had met earlier in his life. A turn was called on Joker at twenty-five minutes, but a handle was not made until fifty-two minutes and Joker scratches strong. Alligator has started to dominate the match by the hour mark. At an hour nine, Gator is screaming from his corner to scratch and is showing what he is said to be famous for, "Killer Instinct" and you can plainly see he plans to finish the job if allowed to do so. At an hour twelve, Joker takes the count. We all agree, we have just witnessed two of the best big dogs to ever come down the pike and what a show they put on. The Plumbers are quick to commend Mr. Brown and Mr. Fox on bringing an excellent dog in top condition. They also say they plan on retiring the old warrior, no that he is officially a Champion.

As I look back, I can only recall a few heavyweights that were ever in Alligator’s league. Hooten’s Butcher Boy, Sampson (Alligator’s half brother) were two very good dogs that ended each other’s careers. There was also a dog out of Tennessee that sure impressed me, but in my mind Alligator will always be the best.

Besides a great combat dog, Alligator was a pleasure to be around and always a clown. He was never bred to an army of bitches, but produced what I consider his share of really good dogs. This story goes further than Alligator himself and must include his littermates and both his and their offspring. They represent not just a few good dogs, but a great family of dogs that have stood the test of time, not just in this country but on five continents. You must remember these dogs were never mass-produced, but still have made a tremendous impact on the dogs of today. I have never been overly sentimental about my dogs, but have had a few of these dogs that were special to me.

Of all the things said about the Alligator family I think the most impressive trait I’ve seen is how well it crosses with most any other good family of dogs. I sincerely believe it is a genetic pool that cannot hurt any breeding program, and in most cases adds that something special that comes along from time to time, that makes them special and that is what we are all looking for, right?
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:33 pm

Pete Sparks Interview

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 6:04 pm

Pit bulls are dogs first and "Pits" second. Keep ‘em fat and healthy and treat ‘em like pups ‘til they’re at least 18—24 months old and you’ll come out way ahead in the end. I never could understand how some men think they can "neglect" a dog until he’s "grown" and then expect him to suddenly become a "world-class athlete"!

Hey Pete! What can you say to a person who would like to buy a very game APBT? ( Maybe the son of an "ace") I don’t care about the price of him but I don’t know the "world" of the APBT in USA.

That’s not an easy one. First, I don’t recommend running out and buying a pup off of some hot-shot dog who has won a few but hasn’t showed his prowess in the brood pen! One of the hardest things for beginners to figure out is that winning matches doesn’t have anything to do with producing good dogs! I would worry more about WHO I got the dog from than about the dogs themselves, and I damn sure wouldn’t tell a peddler that the price doesn’t matter!. Unless you have actually seen a dog in action all you have is a bunch of writing in some magazine. It may or may not be true. And hell, I have seen legitimate Champions I wouldn’t breed a coyote bitch to! Why? Because they acted like curs! For example, I remember years ago a "champion" (out of what turned out to be a pretty famous litter of dogs) was sold to some people in another part of the country from where he was campaigned. These boys wanted him for a stud dog. He did have ability and a good mouth so to test him they put a ten pound bigger dog on him. He hung it up in fifteen minutes! He was "game" as long as things were going his way and whipped three inferior dogs to get his title, but a stud dog? Not in my yard pal! A rough cur is just a cur that’s a little harder to game-test.
Never forget this. The winner of a match is the one who sends in the report and usually he’s going to write it to make his dog look as good as possible. Then he can sell the dog for more money.
You will have to do your "homework", meaning research who are the HONEST breeders, ‘cause I guarantee you that the crooks are out there just waiting for a guy like you to call! If you want the best chance of gettin’ a GAME one it’s best to buy a grown tested dog from someone who has been around a long time and has used the dog in his own breeding program.

Will it be all right to leave him at my house for almost 10 hours without supervision? And what do you think would be the best way to keep him there, could I just let it run free.

It is fine to leave a dog alone for ten hours but only if it is properly confined! Never let a pitbull "run free" anytime or anywhere without proper supervision. Unless you really like trouble. Most of the problems between dogs and people are the result of dogs running loose. Dogs, all dogs, are predators and they can and will often get into trouble if left to their own devices.

This next question might make a good debate. When looking for a proven male to breed to, could a dog that was matched but picked up game and still scratching actually be more attractive to breed to for his gameness than the dog that won the match? Obviously the dog that won the match had more ability but if the losing dog had no chance of wining but refused to quit could that make that dog because of it's gameness a better candidate to breed to. Don't get me wrong, I'm not making any excuses for losing and the winning dog's ability doesn't mean that he isn't also game, I was just wondering what people thought about the subject. Thanks again for the great mag. and hopefully people will write in with their opinions about this matter. Yours Truly, Bones

Damn right, Bones! I have always felt and always said that I would rather breed to a good, game 3 hour loser than to one of these totally untested, "30 minute champions"! Why? Because many of them have a few easy goes and then quit the first time they run into a real bulldog! A cur is a cur and it don¹t matter how hard he bites or how smart or talented he is. If he ain¹t game he¹s not going to be used in my breeding program. It is gameness that separates our bulldogs from all the other breeds in the world. there are breeds that can probably bite as hard or harder; breeds that have more agility or can run faster; have bigger teeth, thicker fur and so on. But none of those things does them much good against a bulldog for one important reason. A bulldog is gamer than they are!
They can bite the hell out of him and he¹ll keep coming. They can frustrate him with fancy moves and mouth-speed but he¹ll keep coming. Or they can outrun him but he¹ll keep chasing until he catches them! So what will happen if everyone breeds for hard mouth and talent and we lose the gameness (as some lines have already done)? How will our dogs be any better than a Rottweiler or a Rhodesian Ridgeback then?
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:34 pm

Snakeman's GR CH Pedro ROM

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 6:10 pm

Grand champion Pedro was bred by James Crenshaw, who owned Ch Rascal at the time of the breeding to Dow's Sandy. Sandy was a product of Wood's Oso Negro(Ch Rascal's brother) being bred to Ch Honeybunch. She was a very good producer as she appears in the pedigree of some very good dogs: holcomb's Zeus and Meade's Gr Ch Crazy Turf Man just to name a couple.

Pedro was game tested for :45 at a young age and showed that he was a dead game dog, but didn't show the bite and flash that Crenshaw was looking for. Pedro then went to Emmitt A. and was advertised in the journal, at stud by Bobby Cox under the name of Wee Willie. He won many matches under the name of Wee Willie and Lil Joe. A. Davis Sr. (A.K.A. the snakeman) then purchased Pedro from Emmitt for $600. Immediately after purchasing Pedro, Snakeman took him to the pit.

His first amtch was into the Alabama Boys at 35 pounds.It took :37 to total this dog as Pedro showed a devestating bite in this match. Number two was into Texas' Cupid at 35 and a half pounds,this turned out to be Pedro's longest and hardest match, as it lasted 2:47 with both dogs scratching until Cupid expires trying to make his last. With two impressive victories, Snakeman is now ready to take a shot at a championship with his dog he feels you will have to kill in order to beat. Pedro's third comes two months later, Tar Heel's Buck. Snakeman saw Buck go previously and knew Pedro could beat him even though it was a short time after his last match. Perdo finished Buck in :47, but many claimed it was over in :10. After winning his championship, Snakeman was approached by A. Nance, who claimed his Big Ben dog could whip Pedro. Subsequently a match was set for the following month, with Pedro going into a 2X winner Big Ben at 35 pounds. By the :10 mark it looked as if Ben was going to do just that, but Pedro took a skin hold on the lip for :30. By the :50 mark, Pedro comes to the top and has Big Ben looking for a way out. AT :52 Ben is singing and Nance picks him up. After collecting forfeits from Super Gnat (Ch Chino), Turlington's (Dipstick),R. Sorrells, and W. Spencer, Pedro was retired. Until Nance comes back, to get his money back that he lost, with his six year old 8X winning dog named Sarge. Sarge was of Ed Crenshaw's breeding and was purchased specifically to beat Pedro. In the match, Sarge was very effective with his mouth and paced himself very well. The first hour was a wrestling match, by the second it was a war, as Pedro got his second wind and buried himself into Sarge's chest. With this win Pedro became a registered 5X winner, thus making him GRAND CHAMPION PEDRO. In all Gr Ch Pedro won a total of 11 matches, 9 contracted.

His breeding career has outshined his match career as he has produced champions Rush, Mert, Pedro jr., Beak, and Gr CH Madge, thus giving him 6 ROM points.

Later Gr Ch Pedro was sold to M. Harris, and stayed there for a short while, and then was sold to T. Garner who made numerous breedings with Pedro and then he sold him to a fancier in Canada, where he died.
GRAND CHAMPION PEDRO R.O.M., TRULY A DEAD GAME DOG THAT LIVED TO TELL ABOUT IT.
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Re: Famous American Pit Bull Terriers

Postby cainenine » July 17th, 2012, 7:35 pm

STP Interview

by back2basics » July 17th, 2012, 6:20 pm

STP Interview :
*24 Champions and 5 Gramd Champions*


How did you get Started with Pit Bulls?

STP: Back in the late 60´s my partner xxx and I were into gaurd Dogs. We belong to a shitzhund club in South Jersey. We had a Bouvier and he went out in 1970 and we bought a Staffordshire Terrier. We were always interested in attack work and the Staffordshire loved it. At six months old he´d do a long hit and he loved the bite work. Around 1972 we met the late John Kicak and eventually got the telephone number of the Sporting Dog Journal and Started getting that magazine.

Where did you get your first Pit Bull?

STP: We got a dog from Jack Kelly that was sired by Fiorilla´s MOOTZIO, who was sired by Fiorilla´s Red KING a 2x winner from a Tudor x Corvino bloodline and out of Kelly´s DANCER who was a litter mate to Kelly´s CH. DRUMMER.

Did you get to Match him?

STP: No, she was a house dog. I got the next dog from Charles Sykes, who was out of Sykes`CHERRY and she was a litter mate to Sykes´SAMPSON, the dog that won over CH. Rascal.

At that time did you have anyone to look up too?

STP: We used to go over to Jack Kelly´s place. They had a spot in New York and on Sunday mornings we´d go over there and they would roll dogs and occasionally have some matches. We met Andre Giroux, Ozzie Stevens and the dog men from Rhode Island like Indian Eddie and Joe Goffart.

How did S.T.P originate?

My partner xxx and I were the the originators. Then we got freindly with Mr. T and became partners with him and then Solo became a partner, he had been part of the Uptown Boys. Solo left the partnership about 1980 but the name stuck and we stayed S.T.P all these years.

You guys owned a lifetime of good dogs, which did you think were the best?

STP: Gr.CH. BUCK.. Gr.CH. JOHN BOY; Gr.CH. CANDY; CH. MAGGIE; and more recently Gr.CH. LUKANE.

Who are some of the best handlers and conditioners you have seen in the game?

STP: James Crenshaw, always seems to have a dog in exellent condition. Ozzie Stevens. The late Barney Fife and Ben Calloway always had their dogs in great condition.

What were some of the best matches you ever saw?

STP: JEEP X HOMER; BUCK X SANDMAN;. BLACK GIRL and JUMBO GINA were first time out dogs but were tremendous dogs.

When it comes to Match dogs what style do you prefer?

STP: I like a dog that work anywhere he has to. A well balanced dog with talent, speed and good natural air.

Do you think traveling with a dog to a Match has a big effect on a dog?

STP: I don´t think it has much effect at all, unless the dog gets car sick or really stressed.

How do you go about choosing a judge?

STP: Some one who is experienced dog man and has Judge several shows.

What about giving up weight? Would you take the forfeit and go on with the match?

STP: You should never give up weight. If someone comes in over you should take his forfeit. If the other fellow is only slightly over you should take his forfeit and agree to a new match.

You have been competing for over 30 years and won in times from 30 minutes to 3 hours. Which do you consider your best win?

STP: BUCK´s win over SANDMAN, no doubt.

How did that Match between two Grand Champions come about?

STP: BUCK was retired 6x winner and four years old and we Started to do some breedings with him. Ricky Jones was the big man in the South and we were doing pretty well in the North. There was some talk about who had the better dogs, The North or the South. We called Ricky and said let´s do it and he was ready. Both dogs were close to six years at the time of the match.

Do you have any suggestions when it comes to conditioning?

STP: I like a manual, slat mill, strength work and hand walking. Road work is good but we never did a whole lot of it. We prefer Treadmill work to anything else.

When looking for a stud dog, what qualities do you look for? Since I have been in the Game and with all the resarch I have done, has bred to more Champions and Grand Champions. Do you guys really believe in your slogan, P/"Performance is everything when it comes to a stud dog?

STP: Yes, performance and the bloodline to back it up. When it comes to breeding performance is right at the top, but it is also important that the stud come from a proven line.

What do you think works better, Inbreeding, Line Breeding or complete out crossing?

STP: We always practice what I should call "Loose Line breeding" with the emphasis on good dogs. I don´t particuarly care fore Inbreeding and will out cross a good proven to a good dog as long as both come from good bloodlines themselves, even tho they are unrelated.

I´m going to mention a few bloodlines, would you eleborate on their performance and producing?

STP: I only know what I read in the magazines and what I hear. I´ve heard CHINAMAN = FRISCO dogs are rough but I have never matched any and really can´t say. JEEP + RASCAL dogs? JEEP was obviously a great producer but I never seemed to have much luck with that bloodline.

You had some success with "BOYLES" dogs. Can you tell me something of the ones you have had?

STP: Over the past 7-8 years we have had some very good Boyles dogs. They seem to be very well rounded dogs, with high ability along with Gameness and a lot of intensity. They are early starters and one of the best bloodlines that I´ve seen over the years. We had Gr.CH. CANDY and CH. BLACK PAZMANIAN. We bred PAZ to MISS RAGE, to CHINA GIRL a daughter of BUCK and we got some very good dogs - CLEAN MARY, BAD ROSEMARY and MARY LOU. ROSEMARY had the hardest mouth that I´ve ever seen.

Gr. CH. BUCK was your favorite dog, but it seems you never had much of the Patrick bloodline?

STP: BUCK was the hardest dog to beat that we ever had, but at that time there wasn´t a whole lot of Patrick dogs in this part of the country. Consequently most of the breedings made with him are out crosses and he still produced real well.

What about the Red BOY x JOCKO bloodline? It gave you two Gramd Champions and several Champions. Was that your favorite bloodline?

STP: Over the years we have probably had more success with Red BOY x JOCKO than anything else we had. Dogs like Gr.CH. JOHN BOY, CH. TORO, CH. CLYDE, CH. SASSY, Gr.CH. LUKANE. They were all tough, durable dogs.

What advice would you give to young dog men just starting out?

STP: Be objective. Don´t be kennels blind and be the toughest Judge on your own dogs. Believe what you see, don´t add or subtract anything more then what you see.

Nobody has ever had your record of 24 Champions and 5 Gramd Champions. Do you think anyone will ever tie or break that record?

STP: Probably. But it will take a lot of hard work and dedication.

You have accomplished everything you wanted in the Game. Do you feel you would like to retire?

STP: Nope. I´m going to compete till I can´t walk
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